What We Read: Favorite Papers of 2016

Part two of our Year in Review: we describe our favorite papers of 2016. These papers did not necessarily have to have been part of our Friday link dump series, What We’re Reading, which focuses on the WildlifeSNPits theme of the intersection between evolution and conservation. Anna So this year, after much deliberation, I’ve selected…

Year in Review: What We Wrote 2016

Anna I feel as though 2016 has been a slow year for papers for me, with a number of works in progress taking longer than I thought they would. However, I am ending the year with a handful of papers either in review or almost ready to submit, so I hope that 2017 will be much better….

What We’re Reading: Jan 22, 2016

“Jade of the Sea” Oh come on! Just as the world begins to apply pressure to elephant poachers and ivory consumers in an attempt to decrease the killing, trinket carvers are turning to another threatened species for raw materials, the giant clam (Tridacna gigas). The linked article has a lot of great information, everything to…

Year in Review: What We Wrote 2015

Anna Two of my 2015 papers tackle aspects of the same question: how reliable are genetic tests to detect wildlife from trace DNA samples? It’s great to be able to use DNA to work out which species of mammal has been pooping in the woods, or to confirm the identification of a museum sample or roadkill of uncertain origin. But…

What we’re reading: January 9, 2015

The Challenge of Translating Genomics into Conservation Practice A must read for academics or applied conservationists interested in applying genomic techniques to a conservation problem. We’ve written about challenges with conservation genomics before. While this article (sub) highlights the potential value of genomics to conservation, it highlights two important limitations. First, this article puts in…

Ecological Genomics 2014 Themes

I just got back from Kansas State University’s 12th Ecological Genomics Symposium (EcoGen2014, this year with Twitter hashtag #ecogensymp). I covered the themes from last year’s meeting and wanted to do the same this year. The themes I keyed in on from 2014 included: the importance of phenotyping and how genomics informs managed species. Phenotypes…

What we’re reading: Oct 24, 2014

Evolutionary Conservation Since the premise of this blog is write about evolution, conservation, and their intersection, the thesis of this article (open), that evolution can inform conservation, is nothing new to us! The authors layout the links between these two disciplines nicely and give researchers ideas for a path forward in evolutionary conservation. Ecotype Evolution…

What we’re reading: Aug 29, 2014

Conservation Genomics Science has largely transitioned to genomics research, but for conservation, genomics research has been lagging behind. Should scientists use genomics instead of genetics? And When? This review (open) explores these questions and offers advice on informing managers for conservation action. Do we need a new way to name species? This paper (sub) compares…

What we’re reading- March 27, 2014

Cryptic gene-flow in hellbenders Our colleague Sheena Feist published this paper (sub) on gene-flow in hellbenders (large aquatic salamanders). Hellbenders have moderate levels of genetic diversity within rivers with little differentiation and no isolation by distance. This contradicts what scientists previously thought and suggest dispersal occurs at greater distances. How aDNA changed our understanding of…

What we’re reading- Dec 6, 2013

Conscientious consumption: Palm oil Replacement of forests with palm oil plantations removes habitat for many wildlife species. The Cheyenne Mountain Zoo developed an iPhone application to help consumers choose products without palm oil. They also maintain a blog about palm oil production and wildlife. Red tide killing manatees Red tide has not only killed hundreds…

Ecological Genomics 2013 Themes

I just got back from Kansas State University’s 11th Ecological Genomics Symposium (EcoGen2013). The organizers continually invite speakers at the forefront of ecological and evolutionary genomics, and this year was no different. In addition to 14 engaging talks, the attendees are friendly and willing to discuss great science (and often unpublished results). It’s a great…