Conservation in action: videos and teaching resources

I’m a fan of celebrating conservation success stories and sharing conservation optimism. In fact I’ve written about this before. Today, I want to share some wonderful teaching resources, that also highlight some reasons for hope in wildlife conservation. A little while back, I asked twitter to recommend short videos about mammal conservation in Australia, to…

There’s no such thing as “boring” data in citizen science

As a child I was hooked on wildlife documentaries (I still am…) and from these I gleaned that the career highlight of any self-respecting botanist or zoologist was to discover a new species. For a while that was my goal too, but then I became sidetracked by questions about genetics and evolution and conservation. Fast…

What We’re Reading: Dec 11, 2015

Looking Into the Past Cetacean Style Add whale baleen (the structures that facilitate filter feeding in the Mysticeti family*) to the list of biological structures that provide time series of data. Researchers can analyze both stress and reproductive hormone levels along the length of baleen, thereby providing a multi-year physiological profile of an animal. It’s…

Happy 2nd Blogiversary WildlifeSNPits!

Taking today to sum up our second year of blog posts and look towards the future here at WildlifeSNPits. Looking Back Last year we summarized our first year of blogging, and wanted to do that again. We posted 35 original articles and 22 What We’re Reading posts. While our most viewed post was What to…

What we’re reading: Nov 7, 2014

Education and Positive Conservation Outcomes This paper (open) describes a community outreach program specifically aimed at reducing poaching of five ungulate and one rodent species in a reserve in Thailand. Pressure dropped by a factor of four and was not correlated with park patrol. The six species increased significantly over the course of the study…

Happy 1st Blogiversary WildlifeSNPits!

It’s been a year since we launched WildlifeSNPits.  Milestones are always a great time for reflection but also a time to look forward.  Therefore we’d like to sum up our year and let you know what’s in store for year two! Looking Back First, a huge thanks to our readers! We’ve very much enjoyed the…

Go Science! Attracting girls to STEM careers with sparkles

This past weekend I attended the USA Science & Engineering Festival in Washington, D.C. This was the first time I had been, but I could tell there was a tremendous push towards attracting and including girls in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) careers. Just walking by I saw “girl” booths splashed with pinks and…

Changing Public Attitudes towards Wildlife with Education and Outreach

I have had a love for frogs and salamanders since childhood and have made them the focus of the majority of my research. Being engaged in this field, most of the people I interact with have similar feelings towards herps causing me to forget that this isn’t “the norm” public attitude towards these animals. This…

What we’re reading- Oct 18, 2013

Nature Deficit Disorder Only 1 in 5 children in the UK feels connected to nature. This disconnect from nature has real consequences for conservation efforts in coming generations, and really emphasizes the need for wildlife outreach. Microchipping Rhinos Kenya plans to place microchips in the horns of rhinos to deter poachers and/or track horns in…