Top 10 Reasons Science is Patriotic

Patriotism is defined as “having or showing great love and support for your country.” This Fourth of July, American bloggers Stephanie Schuttler and Emily Puckett show how supporting science reflects great love and support for the United States of America and is a democratic process in and of itself. Science inspires. Scientific and technological innovations made…

Patronus Charms for Imposter Syndrome

This was inevitable, right?!  Imposter syndrome is clearly the dementor of working professionals, immobilizing people by making them think the worst of their ability to do their job. Sometimes you know its coming almost like you’re apparating right into Azkaban; but sometimes it attacks you out of nowhere like when you’re minding your business walking…

This is What a Scientist Looks Like

Three years ago I began working with teachers in an intensive externship. Over three-week periods, they would train alongside me every day, developing lesson plans for classrooms based on my research. One of my teachers, not expecting me to look the way I did, called me fancy. The name stuck as I am now @FancyScientist…

Too Much I in Scicomm?

A couple of weeks ago, I came across the following tweet: Guilty as charged! By trade, I am a scientist, but for fun/professional growth/genuine interest in spreading the message of science, I also consider myself a science communicator. I agree with @LadyNaturalist that a lot of science communicators do talk, tweet, and Instagram about themselves….

Ask Stupid Questions: Science Writing Tips I Learned from Carl Zimmer

Science writing is hard. What’s even harder, is science writing that is accessible, exciting, and has mass appeal to non-scientists. Author and blogger Carl Zimmer has been able to crack this code. As an advocate and participant of science communication, I couldn’t turn down the opportunity to hear him speak. From his interview at the…

A Day in the Life of a Postdoc: Emily

To celebrate Ada Lovelace Day, we each documented what our lives as women in STEM looked like on Oct 6th, 2015. My day through my eyes is below; not too dissimilar from Anna and Stephanie. But first I want to reflect on what I like about being a scientist. The cyclic part of science is…

A Day in the Life of a Postdoc: Anna

Today, 13th August, is Ada Lovelace Day, which celebrates the achievements of women in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields. Ada Lovelace was one of the first women admitted to the Royal Astronomical Society and is regarded by many to have been the first computer programmer. To mark the occasion, we thought we’d take…

Let’s share some science joy!

It’s Friday, and nearly the end of the month. Think back over the last week, the last few weeks. Have you been a science grouch? I know I have. Perhaps you’ve complained about the lack of job opportunities in science? Your paper got bad reviews? Your sequencing failed? Or something else…? If I look back,…

I am Not a Nerd

Science has a stereotype problem. Scientists are not thought of being exactly cool; but rather nerds, geeks, super smart, and with obscure interests. Instead of fighting this and trying to be the cool kids, there has been a movement of sorts promoting the acceptance of nerdom. We’re nerdy, let’s own it, and make it cool….

The Role of Men in “Women in Science”

Being a woman in science, naturally I have been thinking about the whole movement of “Women in Science.” It’s been gaining momentum with a growing number of tweets (#womeninscience), Facebook shares of news and blogs, and sessions at scientific meetings popping up. We’ve all heard the depressing statistics – less pay, higher chances of dropping…